Children's Behavioral Health Summit 2015
Sessions & Speakers

William P. Martone, MSSession 1: Building Bridges: Transforming Residential Interventions Toward Sustained Positive Outcomes

The national Building Bridges Initiative (BBI) seeks to ensure positive sustained outcomes for youth and families touched by residential interventions and their community program counterparts. Toward this end, BBI is focused on partnerships, especially ones with state agencies and residential leaders, and supports its partners in their ongoing work towards ensuring quality programs and positive outcomes for those served. This session will focus on the critical practice elements that are needed to move residential care toward positive outcomes. Challenges that are typically encountered during the transformation process will be explored, as well as a review of successful strategies that have been utilized to overcome these challenges.

About the Presenter: William P. Martone, M.S.  Mr. Martone currently serves as the president of WPM Consulting, Inc., and is an associate of Ascend Partners Group. He previously served for more than 20 years as chief executive officer for what is now one of the largest child and family services agencies in Los Angeles County, Hathaway-Sycamores Child and Family Services.

Mr. Martone earned his bachelor's degree from Providence College and received his master's degree from Russell Sage College. He began his career in 1972 at Parsons Child and Family Center, a multi-service agency located in Albany, New York. In 1983, he moved to Illinois and accepted a position with the Children's Home and Aid Society of Illinois, a statewide agency where he eventually served as vice president for residential treatment services until his move to California 11 years later.

Upon his move to California in 1994, Mr. Martone served as CEO of The Sycamores. Under his leadership, the agency grew from its roots in residential treatment and evolved into a behavioral health and child welfare agency with the comprehensive array of programs and services offered today, including those services obtained through the merger in 2005 with Hathaway Children & Family.

 

Murelle G. Harrison PhDSession 2:  Preventing Mental, Emotional and Behavioral Disorders in Children

This session will focus on providing an overview on how preventing mental, emotional and behavioral disorders in children focuses on health promotion. Developmentally appropriate behavioral competencies have been established throughout the life-span. Relevant risk and protective factors have been identified at the individual, family and community levels. Appropriate interventions occurring during transitional periods can effectively mitigate risk factors and seriously increase protective factors, thereby preventing the long-term, adverse effects of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders. A case study on the impact of early intervention addressing autism will be presented.

About the Presenters:  Murelle G. Harrison Ph.D. Dr. Harrison was among the first Office of Substance Abuse Prevention (OSAP) grantees in 1988. OSAP eventually became the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP). Dr. Harrison secured approximately $4.5 million to prevent substance abuse and violence in both Baton Rouge and New Orleans throughout the 1990s through CSAP. In 1999, Dr. Harrison was awarded a $2.2 million research grant from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to prevent substance use among 12 year olds in rural Louisiana with a supplement to collect similar data in rural South Africa. In addition to grant writing, Dr. Harrison has served as a grants reviewer and has been awarded grants from local, state and national agencies.

Paula Carreiro

Dr. Harrison currently serves as a prevention consultant for the Louisiana Office of Behavioral Health and is working to develop the prevention workforce. She provides prevention skills training across the state and prepares applicants for the International Credentialing & Reciprocity Consortium (IC&RC) Prevention Specialist Examination, for which she is a Louisiana delegate.

Dr. Harrison also serves on the State Epidemiological Workgroup (SEW) and the Prevention Systems Committee (PSC). Dr. Harrison is retired chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern University, where she is currently associate dean for the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Most recently, Dr. Harrison became a founding member and the executive director of the Gardere Initiative Coalition, a faith-based coalition addressing the social ills of a high-in-crime area of Baton Rouge.

Paula Carreiro, C.P.P., serves as the director of the Southern University Prevention in Louisiana project. Ms. Carreiro assists in training across the State and ensures CEUs for participants. She has used her knowledge from the field of prevention to initiate an early intervention with her son, who was initially diagnosed with Asperser's syndrome and later autism.

 

Pam Tindall, CPPSession 3:  Engaging Military Families in Community Prevention: Partnerships for Success

During this session, participants will learn about military culture and steps they can take to become culturally competent when providing community-based services to military families. In addition, participants will discover how local communities, community-based providers and coalitions can engage and partner with military families to ensure quality service delivery.

About the Presenter:  Pam Tindall, CPP.  Ms. Tindall has dedicated more than 20 years to the field of substance abuse prevention, consulting in all 50 states and across urban, rural and frontier communities, including those of Alaskan Natives, Native Americans and Pacific Islanders. Her range of work has included community substance abuse prevention program development, evaluation, prevention workforce development, K-12 prevention education and student assistance, school drop-out prevention and both inpatient and outpatient drug treatment. Pam's son and daughter-in-law are active-duty members of the military and have been deployed multiple times.

 

Mary Margaret Gleason, MDSession 4: Practical Approaches to Integrating Care

This session will describe some of the fundamental tools and practices that support attention to behavioral health in the primary care setting. Among these are universal screening for social-emotional problems and implementation of the common factors approach of evidence-based treatments, as promoted by the American Academy of Pediatrics. Attendees will consider opportunities for next steps in promoting access to quality pediatric behavioral health care and substance abuse prevention and intervention activities.

About the Presenter:  Mary Margaret Gleason, MD.  Dr. Gleason is a pediatrician and child and adolescent psychiatrist who serves as the Director for Tulane Infant Mental Health Services. In her academic work, Dr. Gleason focuses on early identification of childhood behavioral health disorders; early childhood behavioral health disorders in high-risk children, especially reactive attachment disorder; and delivery models that increase access to quality early childhood behavioral health care in the medical home. She provides consultation to primary care providers around early childhood behavioral health. She has also coordinated an effort to define the evidence base related to preschool medications and developed algorithms to guide responsible treatment decisions. She serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics Early Brain and Child Development Leadership Workgroup and is on the task force revising Zero to Three's Diagnostic Criteria: 0-3R. Dr. Gleason serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

 

Linda Carter, LCSW-BACSSession 5: Safe vs Unsafe:  Focusing on Safety in Child Welfare

This presentation will provide information on the safety-focused practice model implemented in 2014 by the child welfare office to make critical determinations when working with families. When reports of abuse or neglect are received, the initial and ongoing assessments look at how a parent and child function in the household, as opposed to taking the traditional incident-based approach. This family-centered approach is aimed at safely maintaining children in their own homes by considering five critical areas: the extent of maltreatment, circumstances surrounding maltreatment, child functioning, adult/caretaker functioning and general parenting practices. Participants in this session will walk away with a deeper understanding of the three primary elements child welfare uses when determining whether a child is safe or unsafe, which informs the decision of whether the Department can support the family while the child remains in the home.

About the presenter: Linda Carter, LCSW-BACS.  Ms. Carter currently serves as a child welfare manager in Child Protective Services with the Louisiana Department of Children and Family Services (DCFS). Ms. Carter has worked for DCFS for more than 24 years. During her tenure, she has worked in nearly every aspect of child welfare, which gives her a unique perspective in her role as a manager in child protection investigation. She has served as child protection investigator supervisor, foster care supervisor, regional program specialist for the six parishes of the Baton Rouge Region, and area director and the program operations manager for the Baton Rouge region.

Ms. Carter is an appointee to several interdepartmental/ interdisciplinary task forces including the Erin's Law Task Force on the Prevention of Sexual Abuse of Children and the Human Trafficking Task Force. She is a member of the multi-agency learning collaborative looking at substance abuse in women, especially as it relates to substance-exposed newborns who experience Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome. In her spare time, she contributes to the development of up-and-coming social workers by supervising graduate students from the School of Social Work at LSU.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS (Part 1):

Mary Margaret Gleason, MDPediatric Integrated Care

This talk will focus on the rationale for promoting integration of quality mental health care in the medical home, describe successful programs and their published outcomes, and discuss principles that can guide further dissemination of integration models in Louisiana.

About the Presenter:  Mary Margaret Gleason, MD.  Dr. Gleason is a pediatrician and child and adolescent psychiatrist who serves as the Director for Tulane Infant Mental Health Services. In her academic work, Dr. Gleason focuses on early identification of childhood mental health disorders, early childhood mental health disorders in high risk children, especially reactive attachment disorder, and delivery models that increase access to  quality early childhood mental health care in the medical home.  She provides consultation to primary care providers around early childhood mental health.  She has also coordinated an effort to define the evidence base related to preschool medications and developed algorithms to guide responsible treatment decisions. She serves on the American Academy of Pediatrics Early Brain and Child Development Leadership Workgroup and is on the task force revising Zero to Three's Diagnostic Criteria: 0-3R.  She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

KEYNOTE ADDRESS (Part 2):

Carol FalkowskiMarijuana: A Timely Discussion

Marijuana, America's most-used illegal drug, captures the headlines every day as more and more states and cities expand its legal use. Public opinion about marijuana has swayed dramatically in recent years. During this session, attendees will learn about marijuana with a focus on the users, science and politics associated with it.

About the Presenter:  Carol Falkowski.  Ms. Falkowski has been an articulate voice in the substance abuse arena for more than three decades. She is the author of the reference book, Dangerous Drugs, and, as director of the state of Minnesota's alcohol and drug abuse agency, she oversaw the administration of public funds for prevention, treatment and recovery services. As former director of research communications at the Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation, Ms. Falkowski has delivered workshops on drug abuse to professional audiences throughout the country; provided expert testimony to legislative committees; and served in an advisory capacity to many private organizations as well as agencies at the federal, state and local levels. She has contributed to the nationwide epidemiological drug abuse surveillance network of the National Institute on Drug Abuse since 1986. Ms. Falkowski recently founded Drug Abuse Dialogues, a training and policy consultation organization.